Humble Dogs

That they might see with their eyes, hear with their ears, understand with their hearts. Matthew 13:15b

Archive for the category “Energy”

Rants of a Christian Enviromentalist

I am an environmentalist. I believe all people have a role to play in protecting the environment and the eco-systems we live in. Even more so for us who claim a dedication to Christian principles. We were created by God to be stewards of all He created.

Earth

View from Space

Genesis 1: 28; And God blessed them, and God said unto them, “Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every living thing that moves upon the earth”.

It is that word, “DOMINION”, which means REGENCY. God granted us regency in His creation. We, mankind, are to, use the land, the seas and all God has abundantly supplied but, we are to watch over it, take care of it, and return it to Him unsullied. God has asked us to be conservationists, environmentalists, ecologists and take care of this earth. Perhaps, at least in part, it is our failure to look after this earth that the final act of the creation story is to create a new earth, one fit for His Holy Kingdom.

I will admit, I get very judgmental over environment issues, especially towards those whose authority is to look after the affairs of our Country, Province/State, or community. Yes, I am referring to politicians  I live in Alberta, Canada and I realize that even though I am retired, much of the benefits I enjoy come from the resource revenues created by the Oil Sands industry. Some call it the Tar Sands, probably a more fit name but, that is another debate.

The last thing I want in this matter is to have the Oil Sands shut down. That would serve no one. What I would like to see is proper management applied to this resource. Both the Federal and Provincial Governments know the problems with pollution, they have conducted numerous studies, they know the solutions and yet due to heavy lobbying pressure by the oil companies involved, they choose to do nothing environmentally constructive. They boast about the monies the project brings in, they spread economic fear that unnecessary meddling will create economic disaster.

What I don’t understand is why the laws to protect the environment and ecology which are already in place are not enforced over the industries involved with the oil sands.

Several months ago a government authorized study conducted by the Univ. of Alberta confirmed that pollution, directly attributed to oil sands operations, is having a detrimental effect on the environment and the ecology in a wide path, mainly east,(prevailing winds) surrounding the Fort McMurray, Wood Buffalo region. These reports were not released to the public and scientists who worked on the report were put under gag order. The report was eventually leaked by a subordinate several weeks later.

I wrote to my Member of Parliament, Blaine Calkins, on this matter and received this reply:

Dear Mr. Tilley,

Thank you for your letter concerning the recent study done by Environment Canada that confirmed the studies done by Dr. Schindler.

As Environment Canada noted in their report, the levels of containments found in the samples were consistent with contaminants that have been found in areas with no development. Consequently, Environment Canada has decided to do further tests in an effort to better understand the levels of contaminants in the Oil Sands area.

“…the levels of contaminants found in the samples were consistent with contaminants that have been found in areas with no development.” Of course they are consistent – they are the same contaminants blown there by winds coming off the oil sands.
In other words; “We will continue to do nothing.”

I also asked him about the ‘Gag Order’ muzzling the UofA scientists, he replied:

With regards to your comments about monitoring reports being kept secret, and scientists being ‘gagged’, it simply isn’t happening. The process of making reports public is not new, and has not been changed by our Government.

OK, Let’s hear from the scientists themselves after the report was leaked. Watch the following news video.

Government Hides Proof of Oil Sands Contamination
http://www.albertaprimetime.com/Stories.aspx?pd=4450

Original Air Date: Monday, November 05, 2012
The public is learning Environment Canada knew of oil sands contamination and muzzled its scientists. What fallout will those revelations cause?

We speak with David Schindler, international acclaimed and outspoken environmental biologist from the University of Alberta.

Tar Pit #3

Tar Pit #3

This week a new report was released by Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario This time the report was published directly to major news sources. This report confirms the findings of the previous UofA reports of last November.

Oil sands development polluting Alberta lakes: study 
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/oil-sands-development-polluting-alberta-lakes-study/article7014184/

Oil Sands Polluting Area Lakes 
http://thechronicleherald.ca/canada/393673-report-oilsands-polluting-area-lakes

Oil sands pollution ‘clearly evident’, government-funded study says 
http://business.financialpost.com/2013/01/07/government-funded-study-concludes-toxic-hydrocarbons-from-oil-sands-pollute-lakes/

Margaret Munro, Postmedia News | Jan 7, 2013

Leading federal and academic scientists have uncovered “compelling” evidence that Alberta’s oil sands operations have been sending toxins into the atmosphere for decades.

Industry’s role as a decades-long contributor of PAHs to oil sands lake ecosystems is now clearly evident
The team has found “striking” increases in contaminants known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the bottom of six lakes up to 90 kilometres from the massive oil sands operations in northeastern Alberta.

PAHs began to climb in the lake sediments in the 1970s and are now up to 23 times higher than 1960 levels. It says the increased PAHs coincided with oil sands development and the compounds have a distinct “petrogenic” fingerprint different from PAHs generated by natural phenomenon like fire.

Levels of the toxins have almost tripled since the 1960s in Namur Lake, the most remote lake tested. It is about 90 kilometres northwest of oil sands operations in a provincial park known for its fishing. The PAHs are up to 23 times higher in the other lakes, which are within 35 kilometres of the oil sands operations.

“Given the planned expansion of the oil sands, the trend will likely accelerate in future,” says co-author John Smol, a Canada research chair in Environmental Change at Queen’s University.

Government and industry response is; “that many pollutants found in the lakes and rivers of northeastern Alberta are naturally occurring and leached from the bitumen deposits themselves.”

In other words; “We choose to do nothing.”

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An Environmental Disgrace

The Oil Sands and Canada’s Environment

I came across this series of photos while reading an article in the Huffington Post. http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/ They are part of the Garth Lenz’ touring exhibition, “The True Cost of Oil”, which has played a major part in the fight against Alberta Tar Sands Mining.

As a Christian, I believe that environmental protection is an extremely important part in serving God. God made us stewards of this land and all the creatures that live on it. Without a clean and livable environment life, as we know it, can’t exist.

This presentation is directed at Alberta Canada’s oil sands. The single largest source of pollution in the world. Alberta contains only 3% of Canada’s fresh water, Yet, due to oil sands mismanagement, the oil sands pollute 22% of Canada’s fresh water, almost the entire Athabaska basin.

What does environmental devastation actually look like? At TEDxVictoria, photographer Garth Lenz shares shocking photos of the Alberta Tar Sands mining project — and the beautiful (and vital) ecosystems under threat.

Here are several photos from the video presentation:

Click on photo for larger view.

Syncrude Upgrader and Oil Sands

Syncrude Upgrader and Oil Sands

The refining or upgrading of the tarry bitumen which lies under the oil sands consumes far more oil and energy than conventional oil and produces almost twice as much carbon. Each barrel of oil requires 3-5 barrels of fresh water from the neighboring Athabasca River. About 90% of this is returned as toxic tailings into the vast unlined tailings ponds that dot the landscape. Syncrude alone dumps 500,000 tons of toxic tailings into just one of their tailings ponds everyday.

Boreal Forest and Coast Mountains

Boreal Forest and Coast Mountains

Boreal Forest and Coast Mountains / Atlin Lake, British Columbia | 2001
This area, located in the extreme northwest of British Columbia, marks the western boundary of the Boreal region. On the border of the Yukon and Southeast Alaska, the western flank of these mountains descends into Alaska’s Tongass Rainforest and British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest. Far from the oil sands, the greatest remaining coastal temperate and marine ecosystem is imminently threatened by the proposal to build a 750-mile pipeline to pump 550,000 barrels per day of oil sands crude to the coast. Once there, it would be shipped through some of the most treacherous waters, virtually assuring an ecological disaster at some point in the future.

Tailings Pond in Winter

Tailings Pond in Winter

Tailings Pond in Winter, Abstract #2 / Alberta Tar Sands | 2010
Even in the extreme cold of the winter, the toxic tailings ponds do not freeze. On one particularly cold morning, the partially frozen tailings, sand, liquid tailings and oil residue, combined to produce abstractions that reminded me of a Jackson Pollock canvas.

Aspen and Spruce | Northern Alberta | 2001

Aspen and Spruce | Northern Alberta | 2001

Aspen and Spruce | Northern Alberta | 2001
Photographed in late autumn in softly falling snow, a solitary spruce is set against a sea of aspen. The Boreal Forest of northern Canada is perhaps the best and largest example of a largely intact forest ecosystem. Canada’s Boreal Forest alone stores an amount of carbon equal to ten times the total annual global emissions from all fossil fuel consumption.

Tar Sands at Night

Tar Sands at Night

Tar Sands at Night#1 | Alberta Oil Sands | 2010
Twenty four hours a day the oil sands eats into the most carbon rich forest ecosystem on the planet. Storing almost twice as much carbon per hectare as tropical rainforests, the boreal forest is the planet’s greatest terrestrial carbon storehouse. To the industry, these diverse and ecologically significant forests and wetlands are referred to as overburden, the forest to be stripped and the wetlands dredged and replaced by mines and tailings ponds so vast they can be seen from outer space.

Dry Tailings

Dry Tailings

Dry Tailings #2 | Alberta Tar Sands | 2010
In an effort to deal with the problem of tailings ponds, Suncor is experimenting with dry tailings technology. This has the potential to limit, or eliminate, the need for vast tailings ponds in the future and lessen this aspect of the oil sands’ impact.

Tailings Pond Abstract

Tailings Pond Abstract

Tailings Pond Abstract #2 | Alberta Tar Sands / 2010
So large are the Alberta Tar Sands tailings ponds that they can be seen from space. It has been estimated by Natural Resources Canada that the industry to date has produced enough toxic waste to fill a canal 32 feet deep by 65 feet wide from Fort McMurray to Edmonton, and on to Ottawa, a distance of over 2,000 miles.
In this image, the sky is reflected in the toxic and oily waste of a tailings pond.

Confluence of Carcajou River and Mackenzie River

Confluence of Carcajou River and Mackenzie River

Confluence of Carcajou River and Mackenzie River | Mackenzie Valley, NWT | 2005
The Caracajou River winds back and forth creating this oxbow of wetlands as it joins the Mackenzie flowing north to the Beaufort Sea. This region, almost entirely pristine, and the third largest watershed basin in the world, will be directly impacted by the proposed Mackenzie Valley National Gas Pipeline to fuel the energy needs of the Alberta Oil Sands mega-project.

Black Cliff

Black Cliff

Black Cliff | Alberta Oil Sands | 2005
Oil sands pit mining is done in benches or steps. These benches are each approximately 12-15 meters high. Giant shovels dig the oil sand and place it into heavy hauler trucks that range in size from 240 tons to the largest trucks, which have a 400-ton capacity.

Oil Sands Upgrader in Winter

Oil Sands Upgrader in Winter

Oil Sands Upgrader in Winter| Alberta Oil Sands | 2010
The Alberta oil sands are Canada’s single largest source of carbon. They produce about as much annually as the nation of Denmark. The refining of the tar-like bitumen requires more water and uses almost twice as much energy as the production of conventional oil. Particularly visible in winter, vast plumes of toxic pollution fill the skies. The oil sands are so large they create their own weather systems.

Boreal Forest and Wetland

Boreal Forest and Wetland

Boreal Forest and Wetland | Athabasca Delta Northern Alberta | 2010
Located just 70 miles downstream from the Alberta oil sands, the Athabasca Delta is the world’s largest freshwater delta. It lies at the convergence of North America’s four major flyways and is a critical stopover for migrating waterfowl and considered one of the most globally significant wetlands. It is threatened both by the massive water consumption of the tar sands and its toxic tailings ponds.

Tar Pit #3

Tar Pit #3

Tar Pit #3
This network of roads reminded me of a claw or tentacles. It represents for me the way in which the tentacles of the tar sands reach out and wreak havoc and destruction. Proposed pipelines to American Midwest, Mackenzie Valley, and through the Great Bear Rainforest will bring new threats to these regions while the pipelines fuel new markets and ensure the proposed five fold expansion of the oil sands.

Chinese Control Oilsands

In a December 10 column, “Nexen sale decision-making seen through different prisms” Andrew Coyne asks:
“Would someone please explain just what it is they think the Chinese are plotting to do to us? Starting with: How does China acquire this death grip on the oilsands in the first place?”

Here is a possible scenario of how China does just that:

The US is in dire financial trouble and much of that is the trillions in debt they owe to and borrowed from China.

Phoenix Energy Holdings Ltd., the Canadian subsidiary of PetroChina Co. Ltd. is already in partnership with TransCanada Corp. to build a new $3-billion, 900,000 barrel-a-day Grand Rapids Pipeline System south to service the US market. Couple that with the existing pipelines, supplies the US all the oil they need. This pipeline is a guaranteed “GO” by Harper and co.

In five years, the US, under a Republican administration, will broker a deal with China which will ease the burden of debt China holds over the USA. Why not forgive a large portion of the debt? China will never collect on it anyway. Besides, they need their biggest trade customer to remain fiscally solvent.
Part of that deal is to supply the US with cheap bitumen crude from Canada which will force the barrel price of oil sands crude to below $50.
At this price, Chinese companies will be the only producers who can afford to continue oil sands operations.
In exchange for cheap Canadian oil, China will import crude oil from Alaska, also at a discounted price; better oil, shorter distance.
The Northern Gateway Pipeline through BC is started but never completed. Many investors abandon the oil sands for lack of profitability.
Golden opportunity for China to take over under Harper’s “exceptional circumstances.”
Safety will decrease, pay will decrease, exodus of Canadian workers, Chinese workers brought in as “temporary”.
New energy technology will replace majority of fossil fuels within 20 years, possibly nuclear and thermal.
Over $400 Billion projected costs to clean up after the oil sands bitumen demand runs out in 20 years.
The only promise that the Conservatives will be able to say they kept is the 20 year promise to reduce fossil fuel greenhouse gases.

Alberta Oilsands #1 GHG Emitter

The Province of Alberta is ranked #1 of all jurisdictions, provinces and states, in North America for GHG emissions.
World wide, the highest source GHG emitter is the US military. The single entity highest source GHG emitter in the world is the Alberta oil sands.

The Governments of Canada and Alberta try to downplay the oil sands role as a GHG emitter.

This from: OilSands-GHG Emissions

“GHG Emissions – a shared challenge
Regardless of the source, GHG emissions are a shared global challenge. In 2009, GHG emissions from European electricity generation, which make up about a quarter of EU GHG emisions, were nearly 30 times greater than GHG emissions from the oil sands. On a per-country basis, GHG emissions from electricity generation were nearly seven times greater in Germany than emissions from the oil sands, while GHG emissions from electricity generation in the United Kingdom and Poland were each about three times greater.

Oilsands make up 6.5 percent of Canada’s emissions: 0.1 percent of global emissions.
Extracting bitumen and other heavy crude oil requires more energy than the production of lighter and more accessible forms of crude oil. This tends to make heavy oil production more emissions-intensive per barrel of oil produced.”

That is like saying, “My contribution to litter is so minor when compared to all the litter on the street, why should I recycle?”

China Investments in Canada

China backed Kitimat LNG Inc. has already built a LNG port in Emsley Cove, 15 km south of Kitimat which will ship BC LNG to China through Galveston LNG, a company also backed by European and U.S. investors. China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), China’s largest oil and gas later made a 50-50 partnership agreement with Galveston LNG Inc. and expects the share to reach 22% of the country’s total gas use.

PetroChina owns 20% of Shell’s Groundbirch assets plus bought Arrow Energy and with Sinopec a $2.1bn purchase of Daylight Energy last October. Last year Cnooc, China’s largest offshore oil producer, acquired Opti Canada, a bankrupt oil sands producer, for $2.1bn including it’s debt.

The Chinese owned Sunshine Energy is now offering stock on the Hong Kong exchange rather than in Toronto, this will keep investments in Asia where their will be less concern by investors (for peoples rights and environmental matters). Bank of China International, Deutsche Bank and Morgan Stanley have been seeking potential investors and are now taking formal orders for the shares. Sunshine’s choice of Hong Kong was influenced by some of its key shareholders, which are controlled by the Chinese government. Last March Sunshine raised C$230m (US$227m) from investors including China Life Insurance and Bank of China Group Investment.

China has also invested heavily in Embridge and is using this flagship Canadian company as corporate cover to secure access to Alberta crude. Can we trust our resources to this much Chinese influence. Can we trust Enbridge who haven’t been honest in disclosing their record on pipeline leaks, 170 spills and leaks in the United States since 2002 by Enbridge-owned companies. Yes, Enbridge has a better than industry average but the Transportation Safety Board points out that Enbridge and TransCanada were involved in three out of the four reported cases in Canada 2009/2010.

China’s renewed interest in investing in Canada

“Since the end of 2009, China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC), China Petroleum & Chemical Corporation (Sinopec) and China National Offshore Oil Corporation (CNOOC) all have made substantial investments in the Canadian energy sector with a particular focus on the Alberta oil sands development. The China Investment Corporation – a $300 billion sovereign wealth fund – opened its first overseas office in Canada early this year and chose Canada for its only energy sector equity investment.”

“So far the largest single Chinese investment in the Canadian energy sector is the $4.65 billion takeover of ConocoPhillips’ shares by Sinopec in Syncrude Canada Ltd. The Syncrude Group is Canada’s largest oil sands production consortium with most of its production exporting to the US market.”

“The Sinopec-Syncrude deal was followed closely by the successful purchase of 60% of Athabasca Oil Sands Corporation’s MacKay and Dover oil sands projects by PetroChina (a CNPC subsidiary) worth $1.9 billion. China also has invested in Canada’s mining sector since 2009 – notably the $1.7 billion equity investment by the China Investment Corporation in Teck Resources, a Vancouver-based company with both energy and mining assets in North America. In its latest move, CNOOC, the third-largest Chinese national oil company (NOC), acquired the struggling oil sands producer Opti Canada Inc, buying a 35% stake in the joint Nexen-Opti oil sands project in Long Lake, Alberta.”

“The three top Chinese national oil companies made investments in Canada, (2005) including a $2 billion memorandum of understanding between PetroChina and Enbridge to support building the Gateway pipeline system.”

Worth the Price?

Tarsands Oil Exports vs BC North Coast
Which is worth more? Tarsands oil exports to China, or securing the ecology of the BC North Coast. Is it an either or situation? Can we have both?
Enbridge’s economists have calculated that building the pipeline and shipping out Alberta crude will increase the gross domestic product of Canada by $270 billion over the three decades. What is the BC North Coast worth? Can it’s value be quantified in dollars?
Enbridge admits there will be incidents, but can be limited to less than what was spilled at Valdes. Their own analysis predicts 250 kilometers of coast line contamination in the first week after a spill. “Protection of environmental, socio-economic, and cultural sensitivities will be prioritized, and response strategies will be developed to limit potential adverse effects.” NGP-FS-03-003_Emergency Preparedness and Response
The Coast Guard reports 8 incidents in the years 1999-2010 involving bulk carriers and general cargo vessels with experienced captains and certified pilots aboard along the same routes the tankers will travel. The largest of these vessels being less than half the size of mega tankers.
Fisheries and Oceans Canada has identified 15 Ecologically and Biologically Significant Areas (EBSAs) in the newly designated Pacific North Coast Integrated Management Area “… areas worthy of enhanced protection”. http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/Library/329206.pdf
Another important question is; Can Canada trust China?
Are we allowing too much Chinese state controlled investment in our resources? Will there come a time when China is calling the shots? They refuse to ratify an agreement on investments to date. Their foreign policy and actions are abysmal at best.
Is the Pipeline Joint Review Panel just a political facade? Will it’s findings carry any weight in the final decision? PM Harper seems to have already endorsed the project and is about to ratify an agreement in principal while in Beijing this week.
Maybe we can nickname the project, the Panda Pipeline.
Where does the interested Canadian turn for a rational view on the Gateway Pipeline Project?

NIMBY

Bang

#*^*?@+ Happens

For all those who are favorable to having Enbridge build the Northern Gateway pipeline to the west coast, ask yourselves; “What would I allow to be built in my back yard?”

The community wants to allow a company to build a dynomite magazine in our town and the best place is in your back yard. It is perfectly safe. When was the last time you heard of a dynomite magazine blowing up? It will be monitored. Yes there is a very remote possibility of an accident and you will lose everything, but, with new technology, the chances of anything bad happening are extremely remote. We will be selling this dynomite to other communities and we will all recieve some monetary gain from the sales. We will buy our dynomite from other provinces, there is no profit in using our own. We will make more money selling it.

So what do you say? The mayor is on board with the project. We will grant you a special priviledge, how about the Key to the City. That would look nice on your mantel.
You can’t say no. Either you agree with allowing Dynomite Joe to build a magazine or we will expropriate your property, give you nothing and build it anyway.

Enbridge Northern Gateway Oil Pipeline

http://www.thestar.com/business/article/1095775–aboriginal-groups-stand-against-canadian-oil-pipeline

“A group of First Nations in British Columbia says it will do “whatever means necessary” to stop exports of crude oil from Alberta’s oilsands through their territories — including the controversial Enbridge Northern Gateway oil pipeline.

Stop tankers from entering Northern BC waters

Say NO to tankers

The $5.5-billion project, which is currently being assessed by a review panel in Ottawa, now faces yet another public relations setback in its quest to open up a new supply route to Asia.”

The pipeline would move 525,000 barrels a day of oilsands crude 1,177 km from Edmonton to the Pacific port of Kitimat, B.C.
“Access to the Asian market, which is growing very quickly, is extremely important,” said Travis Davies, spokesman for the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers.

I will be the first to admit that I don’t know all the facts about oil production and distribution.  I have thought about energy and environment and these thoughts run through my head.

The Enbridge Northern Gateway oil pipeline could lead to an environment disaster, true. There is a bigger more ominous problem, economic reality. The reality is that Canada imports roughly 60% of its crude oil requirements.

Canada is a net energy exporter, Crude oil, natural gas and coal, 99 percent of its annual oil exports to USA, but, Canada also imports large amounts of these energy products. The fact is its major coal and oil fields are located in Western Canada, mostly in Alberta. The main population and industrial centers are located in Ontario and Quebec. Also many of its oil refineries cannot handle the types of oil produced in Canada.

Canada is being held hostage by the oil industry. Not just Canada – the world. Canada exports near all of Canadian production, money in oil company pockets, and they want to export more, and then import more than half of Canadian needs. Ummm, who does the Tar Sands oil belong to?

If Enbridge can build a pipeline to the Pacific, they can build a pipeline to Ontario. If it means using Tar Sands oil, then update the refineries to do so. They won’t because Canada would become oil independent and would then be in the position to get out of OPEC and have lower crude pricing and energy costs would go down. The oil producing companies would cry.

It is not enough just to extract and export or to extract, refine and export. If the end user is over contributing to global warming, not using the best technology available, the end results will remain the same and the Kyoto Protocol will become of no effect, in actuality it probably already is. Should Canada allow exports to countries with insufficient pollution standards? Canada can no longer play the resource game just for profit. Curbing emissions in Canada is of no account if Canada allows other countries to use Canadian resources and products in environmentally detrimental ways. China and India are the top environment offenders.

Simply put, we cannot allow our environmental obligations to be traded away.

Emphatic NO to exporting oil to Asian countries. Canadian oil for Canadians first. The USA will import all the rest Canada can produce. That is good for Canada, good for the USA. If Canada can help the US in their energy crunch, the global economies will become more stable. That is if the USA has the balls to solving their financial crisis.

Blogs on this topic I am following:
David Suzuki, the Northern Gateway pipeline, and the dollar

The battle lines are drawn, and Northern B.C.’s pristine wilderness is the latest front. With hearings underway into the proposed $5.5-billion, dual 1,172-kilometre Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project to transport bitumen from the Alberta tar sands to Kitimat and imported condensate to dilute it from the coast back to Alberta, the fossil fuel industry and its supporters have stepped up the rhetoric. Environmentalists and people in towns, rural areas, and First Nations communities in B.C. have lined up in opposition.

SolarIMG – GIC Vulnerability of the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline in Canada

Many Canadians are not happy with the proposed “Northern Gateway” pipeline from Alberta to B.C. and understandably so.[1] Fears of oil leakage, secondary environmental impacts, attacks and other concerns are most definitely reasonable and valid and should be raised. Hats off to all of the people who are expressing their opposition to the plan!

BC Natives fear disastrous oil spill inevitable?

The Gitga’at First Nation has been saying no to the Northern Gateway pipeline project since 2006. The project will bring more than 200 huge tankers annually through the waters next to their tiny community of 160 in Hartley Bay at the entrance to Douglas Channel on B.C.’s northwest coast.
The risks and effects of an oil spill are simply not worth any economic benefits, which the First Nation view as nil, says Marvin Robinson, a spokesman for the community.

Sea to Sands Conservation Alliance

BC Environment Minister admits Gulf of Mexico oil spill raises additional questions about Enbridge Northern Gateway project

Canada’s Faustian Bargain: The Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline

Rhetorical mudslinging has dominated Canadian environmental news this week, with conservative politicians and environmental activists coming to verbal blows in the wake of the commencement of the environmental assessment of the Enbridge Inc. Northern Gateway pipeline.
The proposed pipeline will run from the Albertan Tar Sands to a long protected channel in Kitimat, BC, where the harvested oil will be loaded onto ‘super-tankers’ and transported to Asia. The pipeline project is estimated by Enbridge to generate at approximately $5.5 billion dollars, and is set to span a whopping 1,172 km.

Stop the Gateway Pipeline which will bring Mega Tankers to the BC coast. Oil spills are inevitable.
Dogwood Initiative, Petition
The most effective thing Canadians can do right now would be to sign and share the No Tankers petition. The more people who sign the petition the better able we are to exercise the power of Canadians who stand up for their values.

Stop tankers from entering Northern BC waters

Say NO to tankers

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